Sample Letter to Landmarks Preservation Commission Regarding Old P.S. 64/ Charas

Send your testimony to LPC by Monday, May 6th by mail or to comments@lpc.nyc.gov.

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Hon. Robert Tierney
Chair, NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission
One Centre Street, 9th Floor
New York, NY 10007
rtierney@lpc.nyc.gov

Re: Certificate of Appropriateness for former P.S. 64, 605 East 9th Street, Manhattan

Dear Chair Tierney:
I urge you reject the application at former P.S. 64 located at 605 East 9th Street. The building’s significance is embodied architecturally as a premier example of the school designs of architect CBJ Snyder and is deepened by a century-long history as a resource for our community.

Many of the alterations under review are inappropriate to the historic character of the building. The bulkheads are visible from many angles, most prominently from the west along the north side of Tompkins Square Park. As proposed, they will detract from the cohesive roofline, an important and surviving component of the original design.

The interior spaces and historic courtyards at old P.S. 64 provided open space to a neighborhood with a serious need for such space. For the past 11 years, the community has been locked out of a now vacant and decaying structure. The new gates planned along 9th Street will officially close off the courtyard that had historically been accessible.

The façade and future use of the building at this important neighborhood building must comply with its historical intent. Please deny this application out of respect for the social and architectural history at old P.S. 64.

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Sincerely,
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Cc: East Village Community Coalition

New Historic District!

East 10th Street Historic District Designated

The City’s Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) unanimously approved the East 10th Street Historic District on January 17th. This is only the second historic district in our community and the first since the St. Mark’s Historic District passed in 1969.

We would like to thank City Councilmember Rosie Mendez for her help in establishing this district and her ongoing work to protect our neighborhood’s architectural integrity. We would also like to thank Senator Daniel Squadron, Assemblymember Brian Kavanagh, and Borough President Scott M. Stringer for testifying in support of this district, and Community Board 3 for passing a resolution in support. Finally, we would like to thank our neighbors and neighborhood preservation organizations for their help.

East 10th Street
East 10th Street

Our work is not done. The LPC has yet to schedule a hearing for the proposed Lower East Side/East Village Historic District. This district will protect nearly 300 buildings from inappropriate alteration and/or demolition. Please email the LPC to urge them to set a date right away!

LES/East Village Historic District

The EVCC has advocated for years for landmarks protection of the LES/East Village. In July, Community Board 3 voted to support the two proposed historic districts in our neighborhood. Historic Districts preserve architectural character and protect neighborhoods from inappropriate alteration, demolition, and out-of-scale development. The next step is a hearing at the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC). We will alert you when LPC sets a date for the hearing. UPDATE: The East 10th Street Historic District was designated by LPC on January 17th. LPC has set June 26, 2012 as the hearing date for the proposed LES/East Village Historic District.

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City To Consider Historic Districts

The Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) released plans for two historic districts in our neighborhood. The districts being considered are Tompkins Square North (E 10th Street between Avenue A & Avenue B) and E 2nd Street to E 7th Street between Bowery and Avenue A.

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lpc east village_study area r2

Historic East Village Structure Needs Your Support!

59e2arWe need your support in asking the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) to designate the Russian Orthodox Cathedral, at 59-63 East 2nd Street, as a Landmark.  The LPC held a hearing in March for landmark designation but did not take a vote at the hearing.

The Cathedral was constructed in 1891, designed by the reknowned architect Josiah Cleveland Cady, who later designed the Metropolitan Opera House and the auditorium of the American Museum of Natural History.  The Cathedral fits as an historic whole with the already-landmarked Marble Cemetery across East 2nd Street.  Neighborhood support is necessary in encouraging Community Board 3 and the Landmarks Preservation Commission towards designating the Cathedral as a Landmark.  As a first step, PLEASE sign our online petition and please include your name and address in the comments section.

East Village Landmarks Hearing!

Russian Orthodox Cathedral – 59 E 2nd Street

PLEASE ATTEND AND TESTIFY IN SUPPORT OF LANDMARK DESIGNATION FOR THIS HISTORIC STRUCTURE!

In 2008 EVCC became aware of plans to erect an eight-story condo tower atop the Russian Orthodox Cathedral at 59 E 2nd Street in our neighborhood.  Thankfully that threat is gone, due in large part to the rezoning of the East Village which prohibits such construction.  But, the 150-year-old building remains vulnerable – THIS IS WHY WE NEED YOUR SUPPORT AT THE LANDMARKS PRESERVATION COMMITTEE (LPC) MEETING!

On Tuesday, March 23 the LPC will hold a hearing on a proposal to landmark the structure.  EVCC, along with the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, urged this designation in a letterto the LPC in 2008.

Date:  Tuesday, March 23

Time:  10:50 a.m.

Location:  LPC Hearing Room, Municipal Building, One Centre Street (at Chambers), 9th Floor.  Bring Photo ID to enter the building.

Please email director.evccnyc@gmail.com if you plan to attend!

Save This Synagogue

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The EVCC joins a coalition of groups that want to preserve the 98-year-old Mezeritz Synagogue

On August 14, the East Village Community Coalition was the lead organizer of a press conference about the future of a historic synagogue at 415 East 6 Street:  The Adas Yisroel Anshe Mezeritz Synagogue.

For a variety of reasons, it looked as if the 1910 synagogue might be sold and demolished — which would have been a great loss to the community from a cultural, historical, and architectural perspective.

Joining with members of the congregation and local preservations groups (including the United Jewish Council of the East Side, Lower East Side Jewish Conservancy, The Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation and The Historic Districts Council), the EVCC helped spread the word about what was at stake.

A letter was drafted to the Landmark Preservation Commission, requesting an evaluation for landmark designation.  The EVCC also joined others in presenting a request to the State and National Registers of Historic Places, asking for the synagogue to be added to the list.  Though that designation would not prohibit demolition, it would officially confirm the value of the building.

As Dr. Gerald Wolfe, an expert on Lower East Side synagogues, says, this synagogue is “a jewel… an irreplaceable asset to its congregation, New York, and the world.  Its demolition would be an irretrievable, unforgivable loss.”

Since the press conference, the development company that was involved with the plan to eliminate the synagogue announced that it is not currently involved with the project. The EVCC will continue to collaborate with other neighborhood groups in working to preserve the beautiful structure.

The Letter to the Landmark Preservation Commission: download it (pdf)

The Letter Requesting Inclusion in the State and National Registers of Historic Places:download it (pdf)

This Landmark Needs Your Help

FOR THE BIRDS See that open window? It's just one of many where pigeons enter 24 hours a day
FOR THE BIRDS See that open window? It’s just one of many where pigeons enter 24 hours a day
In case there was any doubt about the deterioration of old P.S. 64 (fomerly CHARAS/El Bohio), this backside view shows just how bad things have gotten.  Pigeons fly in and out of every floor of the building all day long.  Windows are cracked and half-boarded up; rainstorms soak the interior.  Every day, the deterioriation increases.

The neglect of this landmarked building must stop immediately, and you can help:

Walk by P.S. 64, just east of Avenue B, between 9th and 10th Streets, and take a look at the current state of the building. Then, when you’re back at your computer, write a few sentences about what you observed, your concerns for the state of this landmarked building, and your thoughts about preserving the building for community use.  Be sure to include your name and any affiliation with the community (such as, if you’re a visitor, a neighbor, or a member of a community group). Then send those thoughts in an email to this address: ps64landmarkdecay@gmail.com

Your words will be added to a letter to Landmark Commission Chairman James Tierney. (Email addresses will be kept confidential.)  This could make a major difference, so please take action and write your email today.

 

Sending an email is a crucial way for you to help preserve the building.  But you can also post your comments on this site by clicking to the next page.

Old P.S. 64 Landmark Status Confirmed

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At a Sept. 15 2006 hearing, the City Council gave a final unanimous vote to landmark this culturally, historically and architecturally significant building. Many, many thanks to all of you who worked toward this victory for our community.

Previously, on Tuesday, June 20, the Landmarks Commission unanimously declared old P.S. 64 a landmark, which means that the school cannot be destroyed or replaced with a skyscraper. (Read eloquent speeches about the building by Commissioner Roberta Brandes Gratz andCommissioner Christopher Moore .) Unfortunately, the owner still holds a permit to strip the building’s facade (see renderings of the “denuded” building), which — for inexplicable reasons — has just begun.